Investigation into Multi-Vehicle Cooperative Vehicle System Applications Utilizing Dedicated Short Range Communications in Complex Urban Environments, 10-R9717

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Principal Investigators
Steven J. Sprouffske
Ryan D. Lamm

Inclusive Dates:  06/04/07 – 01/04/09

Background - The ITS America Annual Meeting and the ITS World Congress were combined in November 2008. The major event planned was a Vehicle Infrastructure Integration (VII) demonstration to coincide with the joint FHWA-major auto OEM's decision about moving forward with VII. A major investment has been made to install nearly 100 roadside units, and there were many vehicles equipped with DSRC compatible on-board radios with which to interact. SwRI provided technical assistance in developing the demonstration.

The objective of this project was to understand the effects on the transmission of large quantities of J1939 commercial vehicle operations probe data over 5.9 GHz DSRC when the transmission is pre-empted with higher priority safety critical applications. Additionally, this project developed and investigated the performance of certain vehicle autonomy algorithms utilizing DSRC.

The intent of this research was to understand how the cooperative vehicle system applications performed on an autonomous vehicle in an environment that is not only rich in sensor stimulus, but is also extremely difficult for even a piloted vehicle to maneuver effectively.

Approach - This project consisted of two research objectives. The first was to understand the effects on the transmission of large quantities of J1939 commercial vehicle operations probe data over 5.9 GHz DSRC when the transmission was pre-empted with higher priority safety critical applications (developed by other Congress demonstrators).

The second involved the use of the Southwest Safe Transport Initiative (SSTI) autonomous ground vehicle and a piloted-vehicle, both equipped with DSRC radios. The investigators analyzed the performance of certain cooperative vehicle autonomy algorithms in a complex urban environment (downtown New York City).

Accomplishments - This project completed the development of the heavy duty probe vehicle data algorithms and integrated the system onto the demonstration buses. The project team successfully demonstrated the system at the ITS World Congress in New York City and on the New York State demonstration routes. The project staff determined that the algorithms were suitable for a V2I cooperative vehicle system. The project utilized the New York City test bed to interact with the signal phase and timing of a signalized intersection. Thus, the autonomous vehicle system modified behaviors through data input from not only the in-vehicle sensors but externally generated data from the roadside infrastructure. The team developed algorithms for the autonomous vehicle to not only respond to the signal phase and timing of the intersection but also transmit a priority request to the intersection through the DSRC communications channel.

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